Earth & Marine Sciences

Earth & Marine Sciences

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The ANU Research School of Earth Sciences is Australia’s leading academic research institution for Earth sciences, home to the largest concentration of Earth scientists in Australia, and ranked 9th in the world for Earth and marine sciences (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2021).

We take a broad view in addressing the big challenges of Earth sciences, seeking to answer questions ranging from the origins of the Earth, to understanding climate change. We have a reputation for international leadership and innovation, focused on developing new methods, whether experimental, analytical or computational.

We are innovators: seeking to develop new experimental, analytical or computational methods, underpinned by in-house engineering and electronics workshops and our highly specialised technical staff.

Our cutting-edge research is led by our academic staff, and provides an unparalleled environment for high-quality research training of our graduate students. Our people and facilities are also the foundation for our vision to deliver world-class research-led undergraduate teaching in the Earth sciences.

Our facilities include the Sensitive High Resolution Ion Micropode (SHRIMP) that was developed at ANU to analyse geological materials.

Facilities

Antarctic remote GPS monitoring

The program monitors the post-glacial rebound which may be occurring near the Lambert Glacier, Antarctica since the Last Glacial Maximum.

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The Centre for Advanced Microscopy (CAM) provides state-of-the art microscopy and microanalysis equipment to researchers, students and industry partners.

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The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics laboratory is a purpose-built 400 sq. m laboratory for experimental fluid dynamics.

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Kioloa Campus

The 348-hectare ANU Kioloa Coastal Campus is one of Australia’s premier field stations, offering a diverse ecology which encourages research across all scientific disciplines.

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The ANU MakerSpace is an initiative by the Research School of Physics and Engineering, where we know people learn by doing.  

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The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) is home to the Southern Hemisphere’s most highly-integrated supercomputer and filesystems, Australia’s highest performance research cloud, and one of the nation’s largest data catalogues—all supported by an expert team.

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The CPAS Podcast Studio is open to staff and students throughout ANU (not just scientists!) to record and grow podcast series. Your success is our success: we want to help you make the biggest and best podcast series in the world.  

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Science precinct

Our new $240-million science precinct on the ANU campus has state-of-the-art biological and chemical research laboratories, as well as a teaching hub.

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The Sensitive High Resolution Ion MicroProbe (SHRIMP) is a mass spectrometer used for in-situ analysis of geological materials.

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Warramunga Station

The Warramunga Seismic and Infrasound Research Station near Tennant Creek in the Northern Territory comprises a 24-element broad-band seismic array and an 8-element infrasound array.

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Designed by Eggleston, MacDonald and Secomb, the Forestry Building (#48) was officially opened on 16 May 1968 by HRH the Duke of Edinburgh with the unveiling of a wooden sculpture in the building’s main foyer.

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Articles

Collage of two images showing people meeting the Prince of Wales

In 2008, Nerilie Abram was a climate scientist working on ice cores at the British Antarctic Survey in Cambridge. On one memorable day, Prince Charles visited the facility – and Nerilie was tasked with giving him a tour.

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Hens and roosters on grass in a backyard

Almost one in two hens in our Sydney study had significant lead levels in their blood. Similarly, about half the eggs analysed contained lead at levels that may pose a health concern for consumers.

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A woman stands wearing a black knitted jumper. A repeating design is featured, fanning out from the neckline, showing the planets and asteroid belts in the solar system.

PhD student Rachel Kirby weaved together two of her passions - knitting and space - to design a solar system jumper inspired by her PhD.

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