Future Research Talent Awards - India

Please note: Due to ongoing uncertainty and challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, and considering the health and safety of staff and scholars, the 2022 round of the FRT program will offer a limited number of remotely supervised projects only. Details of such remotely supervised projects will be available on this webpage in early 2022. Application process for FRT awards will remain unchanged and collaborating institutions in India will be invited to nominate candidates in early 2022. 

The Future Research Talent (FRT) awards are jointly offered by ANU College of Science, ANU College of Health and Medicine and ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science to students from India.

The FRT is a competitive and prestigious program that attracts the very best international students from high-quality Indian institutions and provides them exposure to ANU research in the Science, Health, Medicine and Computer Science disciplines. The program offers a valuable opportunity for India’s emerging research talent to form international linkages and develop research skills at Australia’s best university (QS World University Rankings 2021/22).

Value and benefits

Please note: 2022 round of the FRT program will comprise remotely supervised projects only and scholars will not be travelling to the ANU to participate in these projects. Therefore, no monetary award or stipend will be offered to scholars selected as part of the 2022 FRT round. However, all scholars will be provided with the opportunity to participate in a range of professional development, networking, and socio-cultural activities and events. 

The value of each FRT award is A$6000.

FRT awards provide selected Indian students with an opportunity to travel to ANU to pursue collaborative research, for a period of 10-12 weeks, in a range of Science, Health and Medicine disciplines.

The amount offered under the FRT program must be utilised to directly support the recipient’s participation in collaborative research at the ANU Colleges of Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering & Computer Science and may be allocated towards costs associated with, but not limited to: return airfare, visa (including any associated medical expenses), travel insurance, accommodation, and general living expenses. The management of award funds is the responsibility of the recipient. 

Eligibility

To be eligible for an FRT award, the candidate must:

  • be a citizen of India residing in India;
  • be able to demonstrate a high level of academic ability and research potential;
  • be enrolled in a program at a collaborating institution in India which includes a research component;
  • be nominated for award consideration by a collaborating Indian institution specified by the ANU Colleges of Science, Health & Medicine;
  • be seeking to undertake a research project in one of the specific fields of research proposed by the ANU Colleges of Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering & Computer Science; and,
  • have not previously received an FRT award from the ANU Colleges of Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering & Computer Science.

In exceptional circumstances, applications from students enrolled at institutions other than the selected partner institutions may be permitted at the discretion of the Dean of either of the two Colleges, at the request of a Research School Director.

Research areas

Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics

Research Area/Group Short description of Research Area/Group/Project
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Research School of Biology

Research Area/Group Short description of Research Area/Group/Project

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Australian National Centre for the Public Awareness of Science

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Research School of Chemistry

Research Area/Group Short description of Research Area/Group/Project

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Research School of Computer Sciences

Research Area/Group Short description of Research Area/Group/Project

TBC

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Research School of Earth Sciences

Research Area/Group Short description of Research Area/Group/Project

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Fenner School of Environment and Society

Research Area/Group Short description of Research Area/Group/Project

TBC

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Mathematical Sciences Institute

Research Area/Group Short description of Research Area/Group/Project

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John Curtin School of Medical Research

Research Area/Group Short description of Research Area/Group/Project

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ANU Medical School

Research Area/Group Short description of Research Area/Group/Project

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Research School of Physics

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Research School of Population Health

Research Area/Group Short description of Research Area/Group/Project

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Selection

The selection process for FRT program will be undertaken by a selection committee which will consider the following factors when shortlisting FRT award recipients:

  • academic merit and candidate’s research proposal;
  • ranking of nominated candidates by the collaborating Indian institution; and,
  • ranking of nominated candidates by the host ANU School within the Colleges of Science, Health and Medicine.

Nomination and application

The FRT award program is only open to students from specific collaborating institutions in India. Every year, the collaborating institutions will be provided with nomination instructions, including a link to the nomination and application portal.

For FRT 2022 round (comprising remotely supervised projects only):

Applications open: mid December 2021

Applications close: late January 2022

Successful FRT award recipients will be notified by 15 February 2022

Further information

Funds awarded under the FRT program must be fully expended by the recipient within 12 months from the date on which the recipient was notified of their award.

It is suggested that the candidates undertake their research project at ANU from May – July. However, the timing can be negotiated between the award recipient and the host Research School/Research group at ANU.

The Research Schools, in consultation with the award recipient and the collaborating Indian institution, may also extend the research project beyond 12 weeks. Any ongoing funding to support research experience/projects longer than 12 weeks will be at the discretion of the ANU Research School and the Research group/department hosting the student.

Reference documents

Conditions of Award and Code of Practice (pdf, 670 KB)

Contact

Please speak to the international relations/collaboration office of your institution to check if it is an FRT collaborating institution. Your international relations office will run the first selection round for your institution and can answer any questions about the program. If your institution is not a collaborating institution or your international office cannot answer your questions, please contact ANU at frt.science@anu.edu.au.

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