Biodiversity students branch out in Japan

Study biodiversity and biotechnology in Japan

A group of ANU students recently travelled to the University of Tsukuba in Japan to complete a course on biodiversity and biotechnology. The course, Biodiversity, Biotechnology and Applications, was partially funded by the New Colombo Plan mobility grant.

Undergraduate student Amelia Van Ewijk was one of the participants on this year’s course. In this video Amelia talks about her time in Japan and what she gained from it.

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