Earth & marine sciences

The ANU Research School of Earth Sciences is Australia’s leading academic research institution for Earth sciences, home to the largest concentration of Earth scientists in Australia, and ranked 12th in the world for Earth and marine sciences (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016).

We take a broad view in addressing the big challenges of Earth sciences, seeking to answer questions ranging from the origins of the Earth, to understanding climate change. We have a reputation for international leadership and innovation, focused on developing new methods, whether experimental, analytical or computational.

We are innovators: seeking to develop new experimental, analytical or computational methods, underpinned by in-house engineering and electronics workshops and our highly specialised technical staff.

Our cutting-edge research is led by our academic staff, and provides an unparalleled environment for high-quality research training of our graduate students. Our people and facilities are also the foundation for our vision to deliver world-class research-led undergraduate teaching in the Earth sciences.

Our facilities include the Sensitive High Resolution Ion Micropode (SHRIMP) that was developed at ANU to analyse geological materials.

School

Research School of Earth Sciences

Field sites & facilities

Explore some of the numerous of research sites and facilities established by our research schools in Australia and across the world. Researchers and students at ANU enjoy access to state-of-the-art equipment to help facilitate ground-breaking research.

Research projects

Browse research topics of the College of Science and the College of Health & Medicine with links to relevant researchers.

See our list of potential student projects to apply for PhB, Honours, PhD and other graduate degrees.

Related stories

Analysis and opinion

What are 'internal waves' that possibly sank the Indonesian sub? If you've ever suffered plane turbulence, you've been inside one

Internal waves can create pretty cloud shapes in the sky, as well as making life unpleasant for passengers on aeroplanes. And in the oceans they can be a deadly hazard to submarines.

Research story

Satellites reveal ocean currents are getting stronger, with potentially significant implications for climate change

Scientists already know the oceans are rapidly warming and sea levels are rising. But that’s not all. Now, thanks to satellite observations, we have three decades’ worth of data on how the speeds of ocean surface currents are also changing over time.

Earth from space, showing Africa and Europe.

News

Scientists dig deep to reveal Earth’s hidden layer

Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) have confirmed the existence of the Earth's "innermost inner core".

Woman holding a large jaw bone up to the camera.

News

New software allows scientists to “walk inside” samples

New software will allow scientists to see data in 3D and create life-like models of objects like fossils and mummies, making it possible to "zoom in" on smaller details without damaging the original.

Tobias Stierli / NCCR PlanetS

Analysis and opinion

Ancient Earth had a thick, toxic atmosphere like Venus – until it cooled off and became liveable

Unlike our hellish neighbour Venus, Earth was far enough from the Sun for liquid water to form and create a more hospitable environment for life.