Elmie Janse van Rensburg

My name is Elmie, I'm a Science Ambassador for the Australian National University and sometimes I do a bit of study too, finishing my Bachelor of Arts/Science. I am forever curious about all things science (and all things in general), and enjoy writing in my spare (hah!) time.

Articles

News

What can we learn from the ACT Scientist of the Year?

As nominations come to a close for the 2019 ACT Scientist of the Year award, we turned to the 2018 winner for her words of wisdom.

Student blog

How to survive winter exams

Elmie knows a thing or two about doing the exam period right.

News

Bake your PhD 2019

Research was (literally) served, as students of the ANU RSES had a scientific bake-off for the 2019 Bake your PhD competition.

Academic profile

Chemistry with real life implications: now, that’s dope

ANU Associate Professor Malcolm McLeod is creating new chemical methods for detecting doping, leading to a clean-up in the greyhound industry of steroid abuse.

Research story

Let’s talk about sex. Beetle sex.

This is not the easiest work to explain to your family: you spend your days watching beetle sex tapes.

Academic profile

A day job under the sea

Dr Christopher Fulton sometimes spends six to eight hours a day underwater, assessing how plants and animals in the ocean respond to environmental shifts such as climate change.

Academic profile

Science communication: It makes you think, even if it's WTF

There aren’t many science careers that let you research pretty much whatever you want, wherever you want. Welcome to the life of a science communicator. It’s a tough job, but Dr Will Grant just has to do it.

Research story

Something in the air

What’s an atmospheric scientist you ask? What isn’t an atmospheric scientist is more like it. Meet Dr Margi Bohm. She describes herself as a jack-of-all-trades. That’s the understatement of the century.

Student blog

Biological anthropology: more than just monkey-ing around

If Night at the Museum seems to you like a great day at the office, then maybe you should become a biological anthropologist, or so advises student blogger Elmie Janse van Rensburg.